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Posts Tagged ‘TV-serie’

TRAILER | Tv-serien ”Boss” har nu även börjat visas i public service i TV2.

Så här skev Alessandra Stanley 2011 i The New York Times:

“Boss,” a series on Starz about a crooked Chicago mayor, is almost good, and it falls short for the same reason that the George Clooney movie “Ides of March” isn’t good enough. Both are political thrillers that romanticize malfeasance, imbuing corruption with a sinister melodrama that defies common sense and cheapens the thrill of bad behavior.

Voters don’t trust elected officials, but Hollywood doesn’t trust itself to do politicians justice; screenwriters keep piling operatic misdeeds onto characters whose strength lies in their huge capacity for pettiness.

[…]

There are movies and TV shows about politics that tempt viewers to fast forward through the details of governing to get to the juicy parts. “Boss” is the opposite, a smart look at political power brokers that gets silly on the subjects of sex and violence.

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TV | Julia Louis-Dreyfus (”Seinfeldt”) spelar vicepresident Selina Meyer i den nya tv-komedin ”Veep”.

Kvinnliga politiker verkar för närvarande vara populära ämnen i filmer och tv-serier.

Vi har Tina Fey (”Saturday Night Live”) och Julianne Moore (”Game Change”) som Sarah Palin, Meryl Streep som Margaret Thatcher (”The Iron Lady”) och Michelle Yeoh som Burmas Aung San Suu Kyi (”The Lady”).

Bakom ”Veep” står Armando Iannucci som tidigare har gjort de politiska komedierna ”The Thick of It” och ”In the Loop”.

Carina Chocano, The New York Times Magazine, skriver:

If “The West Wing” was a fantasy of hyper-competence, “Veep” is its opposite: a black-humor vision of politics at its bleakest, in which both sides have been co-opted by money and special interests and are reduced to posturing, subterfuge, grandstanding and photo ops. Naturally, it’s hilarious.

 […]

In preparation for the role, Louis-Dreyfus spoke to Al Gore, as well as chiefs of staff, vice-presidential speechwriters and her old friend and fellow “Saturday Night Live” alumnus Senator Al Franken, posing questions about whether they followed guidelines when talking to the press and whether the Secret Service followed them to the bathroom at night. She also spent hours observing the gestures, postures and body language of politicians on C-Span and getting them down pat. Iannucci describes a hand gesture she perfected that he particularly admired, “a clenched thumb thing” used only by politicians “that no one else does in real life.”

“It’s not a fist, and it’s not a finger-point,” Louis-Dreyfus explains. “You could call it a ‘thist.’ You make a fist and then you move your thumb on top of the bent fingers, like you’re ready to have a thumb fight with someone. It’s not a natural human gesture. It tries to straddle both sides, you know? To be powerful, but not aggressive.”

[…]

As much as “Veep” draws on real life, it has already proved eerily prescient. In an early episode, Selina caps a long and trying day with a disastrous photo op at a frozen-yogurt shop, where her press secretary has been fielding complaints from the owner about his taxes. The episode had already been shot when, in real life, Vice President Biden visited a custard shop and sharply chastised the manager for complaining about his taxes, setting off a minor controversy. (Or maybe not so minor: Googling “Joe Biden,” “custard” and “swear” yields more than six million results.)

Övrigt: Se även trailers 1 och 2. Samt “chacter spots” 1, 2, 3, 4, och 5.

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RETRO | TV-serien ”Mad Men” går in på femte säsongen. Med anledning av detta har Newsweek gjort ett nummer som kopierar hur tidskriften såg ut på 60-talet.

Eleanor Clift skriver om likheterna mellan den fiktiva reklambyrån Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce och Newsweek på 60-talet när hon började jobba på tidskriften.

Women weren’t supposed to be openly ambitious in the ’60s. When I started at Newsweek as a secretary, I was thrilled to be where what I typed was interesting.

[…]

“Mad Men” gets the gender stratification of the time right, along with the prevalence of smoking, the heavy drinking culture, and a fair amount of sleeping around. That was certainly the case at Newsweek In the ’60s among the married writers and editors and the young single women hired to become researchers, then considered “a really good job for a woman.” Newsweek’s training program recruited women from the finest colleges for a stint first on the mail desk, then the clip desk (cutting articles from newspapers), and finally a coveted spot as a researcher. […] These smart, talented, and ambitious women were primarily fact checkers, but they also did reporting and were expected to provide emotional support when the men were doing their writing, everything from sharpening their pencils to picking up their dry cleaning.

[…]

The reality for most single working women was, of course, much more prosaic. A former Newsweek researcher recalls two of her colleagues being dispatched to a nearby bar to order martinis for the male writers and bring them back in paper cups stashed in their purses. The drink of choice was the martini, which former Newsweek writer Peter Goldman recalls being served in “glasses the size of birdbaths.” The three-martini lunch was real, not just an expression. How could anyone write after consuming so much alcohol? Another former Newsweek writer would say, “The great thing about this job is you can do it drunk.” Goldman recalls returning from the magazine’s traditional Friday-night dinners “lightly buzzed—it was relaxing, like a Valium.”

Don Draper would have felt right at home at Newsweek. While I don’t recall any of the top editors having a bar in his office, a couple of the writers had bottles secreted in their bottom desk drawer. The abundance of young single women would also have been easy prey for Draper, whose prowess with women provides endless plot twists to examine how people lie to each other and themselves.

[…]

Newsweek had been focused on civil rights and the growing antiwar movement, and by the time the male editors got around to the women’s movement, discontent within the magazine had taken hold and legal redress was essential. An affirmative-action plan opened up opportunities that I could never have imagined, and after an internship I was assigned to cover Jimmy Carter’s bid for the White House, which brought me to Washington, where I have been ever since. It’s my Cinderella story, and it’s an era that ”Mad Men” captures in all its dimensions. A lot of positive social change took place, the result of struggles waged by many people whose names don’t make it into the history books. To be part of it in even a small way sure was fun.

Övrigt: Artikeln och tidskriftsomslaget är från dubbelnumret av Newsweek (26 mars och 2 april 2012). Läs Tina Browns ”The Mad Men Issue”. I amerikanska upplagan har även reklamen fått en retrokänsla. Titta också på omslag och än mer reklam från 60-talet.

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