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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Kelly’

RIP | Sista numret av Newsweek är här. Fr.o.m. januari blir det bara digital utgivning. Helt enligt tidsandan sätter man punkt med en hashtag.

Newsweek, 31 december 2012

Sista numret av Newsweek daterat 31 december 2012

News-Week, 17 februari 1933

Första numret av News-Week daterat 17 februari 1933

Från första början var Newsweek och Time varandras huvudkonkurrenter. Två veteranter – Evan Thomas och Jim Kelly – minns rivaliteten mellan de båda nyhetsmagasinen.

Thomas: For a reporter, writer, or editor, switching between Time and Newsweek was regarded as a Cold War defection. In 1986, when I left Time, where I was a writer in the Nation section, to become Newsweek’s Washington bureau chief, I was given 24 hours to clear out of the office, and Henry Grunwald, the ­editor in chief of Time Inc., refused to shake my hand (we later became friends, and I wrote his obituary for Newsweek in 2005).

The Time I left in the mid-1980s was a mighty (and wealthy) empire. Newsweek was less grand, but scrappier. At Time, the managing editor, Ray Cave, chose covers and photos in a darkened room where the images were projected onto a big screen. When I arrived at Newsweek, I walked into the office of then–executive editor Maynard Parker as he was squinting at a photo negative he was holding up to a ceiling light. Maybe that’s 
one reason why Time’s photos seemed to be bathed in rich painter’s light while Newsweek’s somehow looked flatter and duller. We consoled ourselves that Newsweek looked “grittier” 
and “newsier.”

Kelly: If I had a dollar for every hour we at Time would sit around wondering what Newsweek would do, I’d be writing this from Hawaii. We even called Newsweek Brand X, as if it were some generic version of us. Imagine my surprise when I learned that Newsweek folks called Time Brand X as well. Any intelligence about the other magazine’s plans was always eagerly sought, and the shrewd publicist knew how to play Newsweek against Time. The frantic cover competition resulted in a very dark Monday in October 1975, when both Time and Newsweek featured on their covers a little-known musician named Bruce Springsteen. The only winner there was Springsteen; in one week, Time and Newsweek shredded their claims that they really were different from each other. Decades later I still ran into people who would ask why Time and Newsweek always had the same covers, and they would cite Springsteen as their evidence. In 1998 the publicist for Oprah Winfrey tried to persuade both magazines to put Oprah on the cover the same week for her role in Beloved and used Springsteen as the model. I felt like hanging up on her.

Läs mer: Andrew Losowskys ”Review: Newsweek, Part One – The History”. Se även 100 tidskriftsomslag.

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