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Posts Tagged ‘Colorado’

USA | ”Live to fight another day.” Så skulle man kunna sammanfatta Rick Santorums framgångar i Colorado, Minnesota och Missouri.

Även om det har varit lite förvirrat i media handlar det inte om några vunna delegater för Santorum. 

Däremot kan Santorum (och Newt Gingrich och Ron Paul) dra nytta av att spekulationerna återigen drar igång kring Mitt Romneys oförmåga att entusiasmera de konservativa gräsrötterna.

Skall Santorum lyckas även framöver måste han hålla ångan uppe. Han har nämligen inte mycket till kampanjorganisation på plats inför kommande drabbningar.

Segrarna ger honom dock möjlighet att fylla på sin sinande krigskassa. Trippelframgången borde göra det lättare för honom att få in nya kampanjbidrag.

Alexander Burns, Politico, skriver:

General-election viability has been a part of Santorum’s message since before the Iowa caucuses. Even when he was polling in the middle of the pack in Iowa, Santorum was urging Republicans there to think about which candidate in the race had a record of winning the blue-collar, Midwestern swing voters who decide elections.

Now, strategists suggest, is the time for Santorum to dial up that argument. The cornerstones of Romney’s campaign have always been his perceived electability and strength on the economy. With unemployment numbers dropping and Romney looking less formidable in polling match-ups with the president, Santorum has an opportunity to ask the GOP to reconsider their assumptions about the front-runner.

He’s started doing that, telling voters in Missouri last week that their party needed to nominate a candidate “much more multidimensional than Mitt Romney” to beat President Barack Obama. In his victory speech Tuesday night, Santorum said that it was his reliable conservatism, rather than Romney’s money and organization,that would give the president his toughest challenge.

Santorum will need to make that case at full blast if he’s going to persuade voters to view 2012 through an entirely different lens than the one they’ve been using. In a way, that’s been the story of his whole campaign — a White House run held back principally by the fact that it seems so implausible.

Bild: Artikel på framsidan av The New York Times den 8 februari 2012.

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USA  | Under tisdagen var det Colorado, Minnesota och Missouri som stod i fokus för de republikanska presidentkandidaterna.

Men resultaten kommer inte att vara bindande eftersom delegaterna utses först senare i år.

Även om det finns intressanta aspekter att hålla koll på blir resultaten mest en värdemätare över kandidaternas förutsättningar framöver.

Medan resultaten dröjer kan det istället vara dags för lite kuriosa.

Här är tre favoriter från “15 Fun Facts About the Politics of Minnesota, Colorado, and Missouri”. (Av Ben Jacobs på The Daily Beast).

Colorado:

The most notable candidate in Colorado political history did not come from either of the two parties and was not elected to office. But his campaign captured the imagination of generations of Americans. Author Hunter S. Thompson unsuccessfully ran for sheriff of Pitkin County in 1971 as the candidate of the Freak Power Party. Thompson’s platform pledged to rename Aspen “Fat City” and to rip up the asphalt from streets and let grass grow there instead. As his contribution to public safety, Thompson, famous for his penchant for controlled substances, promised not to use mescaline while on duty. Unsurprisingly, he lost, but the author used his experience as a candidate to help fuel his future exploits in “gonzo journalism,” including his coverage of the 1972 presidential campaign in Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail.

Minnesota:

Minnesota does not have a Democratic Party. This is not to say that there are no liberals in the state of Hubert Humphrey and Paul Wellstone, but their party goes by a different name. In Minnesota, they are members of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party, or DFL for short. This nomenclature is the result of a merger between the Democratic Party and the Farmer-Labor Party, a progressive agrarian party of the 1920s and ’30s. Although the Farmer-Labor Party achieved great success in the state, electing a number of statewide candidates, including the rabble-rousing Gov. Floyd Olsen, the party eventually merged with the Democrats after accepting that while Minnesota may have space for a thousand lakes, there wasn’t room for two left-of-center political parties.

Missouri:

Like Minnesota, the Show-Me State has experienced a tragic plane crash on the eve of an election. In 2000, during a razor-tight Senate race against incumbent John Ashcroft, Gov. Mel Carnahan died in a plane crash weeks before the election. It was too late to take his name off the ballot, and instead it was allowed to be understood that if he was elected, his widow, Jean, would take his place in Washington. That was exactly what happened on Election Day, when Carnahan won by almost 50,000 votes despite his death. However, Jean would serve only two years in the Senate and would go on to lose the special election for the remainder of her husband’s term in 2002.

Se även:What’s at Stake in Tuesday’s Contests (Not Delegates)” av Michael D. Shear på bloggen The Caucus. Och “Danger Signs for Mitt Romney as Colorado, Minnesota, Missouri Ready Vote” av Howard Kurtz, Newsweek.

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